The Ultimate Degree for Experienced Business Executives

There are extraordinary political and economic developments in Africa that are spawning new rules, incentives, and opportunities for development and fueling new sources of engagement within the global economy. These changes pose three new challenges to executives operating in Africa. The first challenge is the development of new practical models for understanding, evaluating, and affecting the efficient and fair practice of business in Africa. More than ever, Africa needs executives with advanced cognitive leadership skills to discover the limitations of current management practices, develop deeper insights into what works and what does not work, develop and apply new knowledge and best practices based on rigorous and sound empirical evidence. The NiBS doctoral program helps executives develop the ‘practitioner-scholar’ ability, with applied research and analytical skills to navigate these new business challenges by making evidence-based decisions.

Secondly, in the midst of an increasing number of business schools in Africa, there is a severe shortage of doctoral business practitioners and faculty. This situation adversely affects the quality of business school graduates. When US educational leaders foresaw this kind of situation in 2002, AACSB International recommended that institutions design and deliver executive doctorates. Majority of graduates of executive doctoral programs in the US and other countries pursue careers in academia. They bring the requisite business experience to the classroom allowing business students to qualify for the real world. The NiBS program responds to the doctoral business faculty shortage in Africa by developing applied research, publishing and teaching capacity of senior executives.

The third challenge is that, given the increasing dynamism and complexity in the African business, many executives have high intellectual ambition to advance an area of practice in the industry. They want to go beyond the learning of existing knowledge to a whole new level – creating and sharing new knowledge and practices. They want to change how companies operate, how they see themselves, and how the world sees them. The NiBS program responds by addressing the lifelong learning needs of intellectually active professionals who already possess advanced degrees in their fields but wish to continue their education at the highest level; and are committed to pursuing a rigorous program with an aim to become thought-leaders in their industries.

In these brochures from our program partners IPAG Business School, Paris and SBS Swiss Business School ,Zurich we provide you with information about our doctoral program for experienced executives. You will collaborate with other executive participants and leading professors in an enlightening learning journey that will bring the best in you to achieve your highest personal and professional goals. Many say this is a new dawn for Africa, but the dawn requires executive creativity and innovation in business practice to emerge and shine. Our program helps you to discover, lead and share the new business practice and knowledge that would nourish the new African dawn.

Assist. Academic Dean
Aggregate Professor of Economics and Entrepreneurship
Director, Doctor of Business Administration (DBA) Program

Introduction

The extraordinary developments in Africa mean that as an experienced business leader, entrepreneur and senior executive;

  • You want to develop advanced cognitive leadership skills to discover the limitations of current management practices, develop deeper insights into what works and what does not work.
  • You have a high intellectual ambition to advance an area of practice in the industry. Because you want to go beyond the learning of existing knowledge to a whole new level – creating and sharing new knowledge and practice.
  • You want to change how companies operate, how you see yourself, how the world sees you.
  • At some point, you may pursue an academic career to help business students qualify for the real world.

Many say this is a new dawn for Africa, but the dawn requires executive creativity and innovation in business practice to emerge and shine. The Doctor of Business Administration (DBA) program helps you to discover, lead, and share the new business practices and knowledge that would nourish the new Africa dawn.

Aims and Objectives

  • To enable experienced executives to develop a deeper understanding of management theory and research.
  • To develop ‘practitioner-scholars’ who will conduct and publish the results of rigorous applied management research that advance an area of knowledge and practice, and
  • To develop thought leaders/teachers in various fields of business and management thought.

Specifically, from a learning and skill perspective, the program enables students to:

  • Acquire knowledge and expertise required to identify, understand and successfully tackle the interdisciplinary, big-picture issues that characterize business management today
  • Exhibit analytical and research skills in formal social inquiry required to define and address complex issues and to disseminate knowledge related to their profession in a variety of professional and public outlets to influence professional activity, management practice and public policy
  • Demonstrate expertise in a specific topic area through the design, execution, and completion of a doctoral dissertation that contributes to the knowledge and practice of the field.
  • Demonstrate the ability to disseminate new knowledge through publications in practitioner journals and conferences and where possible academic outlets.
  • Develop key skills in the design and delivery of educational courses thorough understanding of the theory and practice of teaching in business education.

Duration & Time Limits

The program may be completed in 3 years and is a 9-trimester modular program.

An extension of not more than one year may be granted on application.

Program Delivery

The program is designed and delivered in modular format for the benefit of busy, working executive leaders.

  • Each module is delivered over 2-3 days in intensive face-to-face classes and interactions with Professors.
  • A 2-day class is delivered – Friday-Saturday: 9:00am to 5:00pm
  • A 3-day class is delivered – Thursday-Saturday: 9:00 am to 5:00 pm

You attend approximately 30 days of classes over the duration of the program.

 Timely and Successful Completion

We have several ways to help you complete the program successfully and on time.

  • Professors can suggest a research topic if you do not have one
  • Research Assistance – Full-time Research Fellow who offer assistance and support in your study
  • Combine coursework with thesis writing, allowing for seamless on-time completion.
  • You start your thesis from day one
  • Doctoral writing seminars to speed up your thesis writing
  • Supervisor – Professors supervise your thesis-related post-module assignment; Group supervisor and peer to peer feedback
  • Study in Learning Teams – Students whose research fall in the same or similar intellectual domain will work as a group to support each other.

 

Locations Offering Programs

  • Accra, Ghana- IPAG Business School,  Doctor of Business Administration Program.
  • Lagos, Nigeria – SBS Swiss Business School, Doctor of Business Administration Program.

 

  • – Internationally recognized doctorate degree
  • – Network with top business leaders
  • – Access NiBS executive educative education training seminars
  • – Improve writing skills through doctoral seminars
  • – Membership of the NiBS Executive Doctors Academy (NEDA)
  • – Highly motivated international scholars
  • – Integration of coursework with thesis writing
  • – Technical Assistance from dedicated research fellows
  • – Group supervision to speed up writing for early completion
  • – Peer support and learning teams

SBS Swiss Business School Admission Requirements

Program offered in Nigeria.

      • Master/MPhil Degree in Management, Business (e.g., MBA or EMBA) with no less than 5 years of management experience; or

 

      • Bachelors Degree

A first degree of  second upper standard in business and management with a minimum of 15 years senior-level management experience and a minimum of 10 years of significant leadership responsibility; or

 

      • Professional Qualification

Professional qualifications (ICA, ACCA, CIM, CIMA, etc) with 5 years of relevant work experience;

 

    • 2 Passport size photographs
    • Completed and duly signed application form
    • Official academic transcripts
    • Complete curriculum vitae (CV) indicating professional experiences

 

IPAG Business School Admission Requirement

Program offered in Ghana.

  • Master/MPhil Degree in Management, Business (e.g., MBA or EMBA) with no less than 5 years of management experience
  • 2 Passport size photographs
  • Completed and duly signed application form
  • Official academic transcripts

Complete curriculum vitae (CV) indicating professional experiences

SBS SWISS BUSINESS SCHOOL DBA Courses

  • MGT600- Management Research Perspectives (4.5 credits)
  • BUS600- Information & Internet Technologies for Business Research (4.5 credits)
  • MGT651– Management Research Design and Methodologies (9 credits)
  • REM650– Research Method in Business & Management (4.5 credits)
  • GLO600– Global Environments and Management Trends (9 credits)
  • MGT650– Contemporary Management (9 credits)
  • CRI600– Critical Analysis of Research-Based Literature (9 credits)
  • LIT650– Preparation and Presentation of a Research Proposal (9 credits)
  • DM 909: Publishing Seminar: Creation and Dissemination of Knowledge (non-credit)
  • DBA 910 – Teaching Seminar I (non-credit)
  • DBA 911 – Teaching Seminar II (non-credit)
  • DBA 908 – Dissertation Project (non-credit)
  • DBA 909 – Publishing Seminar (non-credit)
  • MGT600- Management Research Perspectives (4.5 credits)

    This course inducts candidates to the nature of research and commences their learning journey through the business administration and management field using the rigorous research perspective of the scholarly tradition. As such, it explores the development of doctoral programs, their place in business-academic interface, and their position at the upper levels of university endeavor. It reinforces the notion of a history to the study of business, the development of management as a discipline of study and its interconnections with other disciplines of learning. It examines the perceived differences between practical research for day-to day operational business matters and scholarly research that results in original and/or added value contributions to the practice of business and management.

    It introduces the philosophy of scientific inquiry, common research approaches (e.g., quantitative and qualitative) and common perspectives (e.g., positivistic, interpretative, and critical). Students will learn the basic principles of theory development and testing as well as how to build a conceptual research model. This course also introduces students to the unique and practical issues of applied research, such as balancing relevance and rigor. The module also examines the principal theoretical frameworks and methodological approaches researchers use to analyze the field of management. The module promotes intense class discussions that hone the intellectual and analytical capabilities of candidates. The course provides practical guidelines for building new theories that are informed by managerial practice and also extend current theoretical models. In the process, the module will instil the theoretical discipline and standards necessary for students to complete the doctoral program.

    BUS600- Information & Internet Technologies for Business Research (4.5 credits)

    In today’s research world, it is imperative that the research utilizes information and internet technologies effectively and efficiently. The information technology tools can provide efficiency gains in recording and tracking reference sources and completing research papers. Internet provides a wealth of research information to be tapped but can also be a trap if the researcher cannot use appropriate search engines and techniques effectively. This course will equip the researcher with tools and techniques for undertaking a research project.

    MGT651– Management Research Design and Methodologies (9 credits)

    It is expected that students would have little interaction with the use of the scientific method in conducting research. This course introduces the main research methods adopted in business and management research. As background context, the general nature of evidence-based and ethical research is examined before focusing attention on the two major paradigms of investigative knowledge in quantitative research. Special emphasis is on quantitative research. It applies statistical techniques to test new theory and hypotheses. This course teaches students how to investigate problems through the design and execution of quantitative research as it applies to experiments, surveys and the analysis of secondary data. Students will learn to apply and evaluate these methods through examples of theoretical and applied research papers that employ quantitative methods. It develops understanding and skill in the scientific approach to research design like measurement approaches, scale construction, interview procedures, questionnaire design, assessing reliability and validity of measures. Students will learn the fundamental statistical techniques to develop and test research hypotheses, such as the t-test, correlation analysis and regression. Students will prepare data for analysis and understand how to interpret the results. This will include use of foundational statistical techniques such as tests of assumptions of the data, exploratory factor analysis, issues of mediation and moderation and the types of research problems and data structures appropriate for different methods. It emphasizes the selection, application, and interpretation of statistical techniques rather than the mathematical theory that underlies them. It requires SPSS and other statistical software to analyze data. In this module students, working in teams, will engage hands-on to analyze and interpret real research data. Students will present and defend their analysis and conclusions.

    REM650– Research Method in Business & Management (4.5 credits)

    The purpose of this course is to help students focus on the realistic topic and design the research study in accordance with sound principles and good practice. It extends the knowledge and skills required to research business and management issues. Specific attention is paid to individual methods, such as the population survey, focused interviews, case study and action research. As these various approaches are frequently used in the management research, an understanding of their strengths and limitations is also examined. Extensive use will be made of technology tools for undertaking analyses of qualitative data. Qualitative research is the exploration of phenomena in their natural setting that seeks to make sense of underlying mechanisms and processes. This course compares a variety of qualitative techniques, such as case studies, ethnography, action research, grounded theory building and content analysis. Students will review contemporary and classic studies that employ quantitative methods in both theoretical and applied contexts, providing examples of how to use each approach in practice. It will also cover interviewing and observation techniques, coding semi-structured and structured interview data, and building hypotheses based on qualitative data. The course weighs the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches to qualitative research, including positivist, interpretivist, and critical methods. Candidates conduct semi-structure interviews to collect data to develop a case study, through interviews and analysis using inductive coding techniques. The candidate prepares a formal research report on that project, which will be submitted to an academic research conference or journal. The final report constitutes draft of a conceptual model, integrating new understandings from the field interviews and literature arising from the data collection and analysis.

    GLO600– Global Environments and Management Trends (9 credits)

    In an ever globalized world, management has become more challenging. The modern manager needs to be aware of movements in the global environments not only in their industry but across industries and continents. This in turn will affect their management decision making and lead to strategies that will respond to the changing business environment. In order for managers to be able to be effective, they need to broaden their understanding of changing global trends and management’s response. This course allows each student to develop a deep awareness and understanding of current trends his/her professional management practice to uncover key practice innovations, models and as well areas that need improvements and innovations . The goal is to ensure the student is able to discover key areas in need of practice innovation for his/her dissertation.

    MGT650– Contemporary Management (9 credits)

    All academic and management research is a discourse with the literature, that is, the current understanding of management change and cross-culture impacts. The course extends candidates understanding of the literature and furthers that understanding by reference to the literature and contemporary research within the primary discipline of the candidate’s interest. For example, it may examine the principal theoretical frameworks and methodological approaches researchers use to analyze the specialized fields of management such as leadership, marketing, operations, innovation, etc. It develops ability to critically evaluate published research in the area of interest, explores leading research streams and demonstrates how research on contemporary issues contributes to the theory and practice and as they apply in the African context.

    CRI600– Critical Analysis of Research-Based Literature (9 credits)

    A key competency in doing research is being able to accurately comprehend what others have written on the topic about to be investigated. This course focuses attention on how to analyse and critically assess the research-based literature by asking candidates to review examples, related to their chosen topic and develop dependable approaches to research question formation, methodological development and the presentation of research findings. The student must examine the principal theoretical frameworks and methodological approaches researchers use to analyze issues in his/her chosen field of interest. It traces the historical development of theory and research, and examines selected streams of research to identify and analyze their contemporary issues and future research needs. It develops students’ ability to critically evaluate published research in the chosen area of research by covering the most influential papers and current research. This module enables students to develop new research ideas in the area and become conversant with key themes, debates and methodologies in the area. The student prepares three brief essays (approximately 5,000 words each plus exhibits and annotated bibliography) that define the key theories, research directions, methodologies, and key emergent practices in the area.

    LIT650– Preparation and Presentation of a Research Proposal (9 credits)

    The capstone course will ensure that a student can integrate the learning from this program into a well- argued and documented research study that is embedded in the research literature. It will also articulate the conceptual framework/model, the research questions, and the data collection and analysis methodologies. The research proposal will be a key measure of the student’s ability to undertake doctoral research. The key goal in this course then is to prepare students to develop their minds as practitioner-scholars, to develop a research identity by identifying one’s research domain; learn to write in a scholarly style but accessible to practitioners; work with academic literature to identify and digest concepts and theories that inform research on that problem; begin to develop a conceptual model that abstracts how the world may be functioning in that problem domain and points to a research question that can guide the next stage of the research. It involves significant review and understanding of published dissertations and other literature as well. The final deliverable for this course is to present the scope and purpose of the research topic with substantiation for its significance, relevance and timeliness in the management field, forming theoretically grounded research questions based on a literature review, describes some of the relevant variables and expected relationships among them based on theory, and demonstrates feasibility of empirical analysis and a plan for field work and data collection. The module provides partial preparation for dissertation project proposal and for the comprehensive examination.

    DBA 908: Dissertation Project – 36 credits

    The dissertation project develops the student’s skill in designing, conducting, and evaluating business research. The dissertation consists of the traditional 5 chapters. In preparing students to write this forms of thesis, the approach involves tutoring then conceptual paper, qualitative research paper and quantitative research that organizes the study into a coherent thesis. Candidates complete this project under the guidance of their dissertation supervisor. Dissertation workshops are organized to afford candidates opportunity to present their output to receive feedback from peers and invited academics and practitioners. The candidates are required to attend a final oral presentation and defence of the dissertation. The jury consists of dissertation committee, who are experts in the field and senior academics.

    A student develops a formal dissertation proposal that includes the identification and refinement of the dissertation topic, complete development and substantiation of the research questions or hypotheses based on prior research, the explanation and justification of the methodology for answering the research questions. Focus is on identifying research questions relevant to the chosen topic, conducting a review of the literature on that topic, and developing a conceptual model and associated hypotheses. This should results in a conceptual paper is as a preliminary way to frame the dissertation overview and synthesis.

    The conceptual training involves a qualitative research proposal that frames the student’s research problem and question, and specifies a design for the fieldwork portion of the qualitative research project. A qualitative research proposal paper is developed that synthesizes a substantial body of scholarly literature (theoretical and empirical) in a fashion that creates a literature review and conceptual framework that provide insight into a significant problem of practice. The literature review produces a “grand tour” research question to guide the qualitative research project, and specifies a design for the fieldwork to be carried out in the qualitative research project. Students develop individual skills of conceptualizing (including modelling), creating interview protocols, conducting phenomenological interviews, and interpretively analyzing qualitative interview data.

    The second part involves the selection of the dissertation’s research methodology to evaluate the conceptual model and hypotheses. Focus is on identifying appropriate sources of data, collecting and analyzing the data in the context of their chosen methodology, and drawing conclusions regarding the conceptual model and associated hypotheses. The qualitative research presents findings and explanatory concepts from the qualitative fieldwork project. It identifies and frames a potent theoretical research gap wherein current practitioner and academic knowledge is lacking. The research synthesizes significant scholarly literature into a coherent conceptual framework and an understandable model of relationships among theoretical constructs. Students learn to frame effective questions for academic scholarship research that embodies inquiry and openness, aligning the conceptual framework and research question to the chosen problem, and to write scholarly papers that are clear and present a logical flow of well-supported arguments. By understanding the development of grounded theory and understanding ethnographic observation and field notes, students formally and rigorously analyze qualitative data in an interpretive fashion.

    The aspect is quantitative inquiry project is to generate a rigorous and valid quantitative empirical study that is guided by a sound conceptual model of their phenomenon of interest. The study needs to be positioned with respect to the theoretical and research literature of the topic, utilize a robust research design to collect credible data that mitigates biases, reflect systematic and rigorous quantitative analysis indicative of material covered in the quantitative inquiry courses, and meet high scholarly standards to merit publication in journals and outlets. The final requirement for the dissertation is for the student to write an overview statement introducing their qualitative and quantitative research reports, making substantive observations and conclusions about each project, and presenting a personal reflective statement about its significance to the author, the literature and management. A discussion of the future impact of the dissertation research on the management of organizations is a key requirement.

    DM 909: Publishing Seminar: Creation and Dissemination of Knowledge (non-credit)

    This module covers the publication process and provides guidance on ‘how to publish’ in international high quality journals. A fundamental tenet of evidence-based management is that firms will function more effectively if they adopt a theoretically-driven, methodologically-sound approach to decision-making. Building on the basic tenets of theory and knowledge development, this course explores the tools and techniques needed for creating and disseminating knowledge. Participants are challenged to develop cross-disciplinary, evidence-based management practices through applied research that will effectively influence future management practice. Students will be exposed to the requirements for high quality articles as enshrined by top tier practitioner journals. All students will be schooled in reviewer guidelines of these journals as well as the reasons for success and failure. Also covered is the process of preparing one’s work for publication and successfully navigating the peer review process. Students will study journal selection and how to craft a response to reviewers. Each student will serve as an ad hoc reviewer for two the papers.

    DM 910: Teaching Seminar I (non-credit)

    The objectives of this module are to familiarize participants with the academic culture and today’s student, discover what makes truly great teachers, develop effective teaching skills and the fundamentals of course development and delivery, gain valuable insight into the student learning process and understand the implications of assurance of learning in the classroom, and how to create an effective syllabus. The module will cover the differences between academic and corporate careers, explore the demographics of today’s business school attendees, techniques that inspire, mentor, and aid in career development, and illustrate the best practices in management education. Other topics include effective teaching skills and the fundamentals of course development and delivery (Create an engaging and motivating learning environment and planning, organizing, and delivering course contents), the student learning process ( investigate preferred instruction methods, explore social development and information processing and teaching styles and their influences on learning).

    DM 911: Teaching Seminar II (non-credit)

    This module involves students preparing, teaching and grading a course in the specialized subject area to an undergraduate or graduate student group in a local University.  Each student will be filmed and be evaluated by both students and peers. The results of the course design and teaching practice will be discussed with a focus on identifying strengths and weaknesses and areas for improvement.

IPAG Business School DBA Courses

  • DMK G1101 Strategic Management (5 credits)
  • PDP 700 Cross-Cultural Management (5 credits)
  • DCPT 1101 Corporate Financing and Investment (5 credits)
  • DRCH 1102 Research design I (5 credits)
  • DCRH 1201 Research design 2 (5 credits)
  • DMK G1201 Entrepreneurship and International Management (5 credits)
  • DLO G1201 Organizational Structures and Change Management (5 credits)
  • DCRH 1101 Research Methodology I (5 credits)
  • DRCH 1101b Research Methodology II (5 credits)
  • PDP 701 Leadership (5 credits)
  • PDP 702 Executive Communication (5 credits)
  • PDP703 Research Dissemination (5 credits)

DMK G1101 Strategic management

When Mintzberg wrote the schools of thought in strategic management in 1991, his view was that each school was historically located in an economic context, rather than falsified by the next context but used by other groups for their own interest. The oldest concept SWOT gave birth to the entrepreneurial school and was developed in 1963 in a context of high stability, which is not relevant anymore. This school was challenged by the planning school that also relied on the same assumption of stability and by the portfolio matrices analysis inspired by marketing. These three schools nearly totally disappeared under the influence of the vision- statement school with highly individualistic assumptions that were immediately challenged by the mission approach based on collectivistic approach from Japan. The most successful school of thought in the history was the positioning school of Michael Porter in the early 90s that still has the predominant voice in the mainstream. However, each concept of these schools, mainly the market forces and the generic positioning (cost vs differentiation) also relied on stability assumptions.  The dimension of innovation that was a mission in the classical positioning school was introduced by the resource-based theory,  especially through the idea of structure differentiation. Moreover, so far all these models were static, which was challenged by the organizational learning school. The missing dimension of the conflict was then introduced by the stakeholders’ approach which connects strategic thinking with change management. On the other hand,  the positioning school has been criticized from the standpoint of the  hyper-competition theory, where each of the previous models inspired by microeconomics has been challenged under the influence of innovation management. The conflicting trends of research in Strategic Management are addressed in this course.

The following concepts will be systematically discussed: SWOT, Strategic planning, Strategy implementation, vision statement, mission statement, portfolio matrices analysis (from BCG to Mc Kinsey), corporate social responsibility, sustainable competitive advantage, generic positioning, market forces, value chain, core competencies, organizational learning, emergent strategy, stakeholder theory, stakeholder agency theory, transient competitive advantage, network model, dynamic capabilities, ambidexterity. The link between each concept and underlying assumptions indicates a way to suggest a list of theoretical trends: Rationalism, functionalism, resource-based theory, innovation economics, stakeholder theory, stakeholder agency theory, and hyper-competition theory.

PDP 700 Cross-Cultural Management (5 credits)

The multi-cultural environment in today’s workplace provides new challenges to business managers. Globalization has led to an increase in cross-border mergers and acquisitions, strategic alliances, and global relocations. Managing cultural differences is now recognized as a key factor in achieving organizational objectives. Success in the international arena will be influenced by cultural intelligence, and the ability to understand both the challenges and the opportunities that the global environment provides. This course will help participants develop an understanding of the impact of culture on business behaviors and practices. The course will cover: Dimensions of culture, communicating across cultures, negotiating across cultures, multicultural teams, cross-cultural marketing, culture and human resource management, motivation across cultures, cross-cultural leadership, skills for a global manager.

DCPT 1101 – Corporate Financing and Investment

This course emphasizes the theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of accounting and finance practice. The course grounds participants’ understanding of techniques and methods in accounting and finance in their related theories and unveils the basis of conventional accounting and finance wisdom in relation to effective business analysis and decision making by analysts, investors, managers, and other stakeholders of an organization. It shows the keys to effective financial statement analysis and its underlying theoretical and philosophical basis.  Topics to be treated in this course include but not limited to; Theoretical and Philosophical Underpinnings of Accounting and Finance, Neoclassical Economic Theory, Behavioral Accounting and Finance Theory, Financial Statement Analysis and a Comprehensive Case. It presents a balanced view of analysis, including both equity and credit analysis, and both cash-based and earnings-based valuation models, showing the relevance of financial statement analysis to all business decision-makers.

DRCH 1102 Research design I (5 credits)

Sessions shall provide a one to one guidance to each student. Teaching methods shall not be lectures, but only active methods, experiential learning, discussion learning, action learning, critical management learning and situated learning. The support material is made of only the thesis proposal sent by the students. However, these theses become anonymous in order to allow a more spontaneous discussion.  Professors evaluate the ideas, not the persons.  Also, these proposals are re-ordered by keywords, titles, abstracts, topics, objectives and schedules.

During this first session, students begin to draft a first research proposal. One of the easiest way to start thinking about research is to evaluate keywords. While some are too broad or too technical, some others may stand out as a good management topics or a good management concepts. This evaluation shall be anonymous. From this evaluation, titles and abstracts may be discussed in an anonymous way. Then, the topics and research objectives are not only evaluated but drafted. After a short collect of remarks from the audience, suggestions from the instructors are provided to all participants in a written form.  Finally, research schedules are compared. Suggestions regarding the research schedules, research methods and literature references are provided to students. The first session ends on advice regarding the questionnaires to be sent for the next session.

DCRH 1201 Research design 2 (5 credits) 

During the second session of the research design, the instructor provides the students with a review of two documents: 1) The revised thesis proposal 2) the questionnaire.

First, this second session aims to review thesis proposals (titles, abstracts, keywords, topics, research objectives, research questions, research schedule). The reviews of this updated proposal is not sent to students but discussed in class first. These second reviews are sent after the second session to all students. The class discussion is led with the students before they get their reviews,  in order to  promote free  interactions  between students.  Also,  all  the  problem  formulations,  including  titles,  abstracts,  topics,  research objectives,  research  questions  and  research  schedules  are  anonymous,  also  in  order  to encourage students to evaluate the ideas rather than the participants. During this second round, the discussion starts with titles. Then, abstracts and keywords are discussed together.  Third, the full problem formulation including also topics, research objectives and research question is first discussed with students. Then, the second reviews are provided to all students and open to discussions. The  second  part  of  this  second  session  is  devoted  to  methodology.  The  questionnaire  is considered  as  one  of  the  main  tools  for  research  design  through  focus  groups.  Indeed, the questionnaire may be the support of both interviews and surveys. Students are expected to have sent their questionnaires one month before to the administration that shall forward them to the instructor.

All questionnaires sent on time are printed for all participants.  All participants fill all questionnaires in class. This practice allows them to evaluate the questionnaires and provide a feed-back in class. Before filling the questionnaire, each author is invited to conduct a small focus group with the audience including open questions either asked orally or written on a focus group form or on blank sheets of paper. Then, the instructor provides advice both on the focus group and on the questionnaire. This shall allow a secondary design of their questionnaire for each student. Resending the updated questionnaire is part of the assignment leading to the grade of the second session. Then, the case study methodology is introduced, including the use of interviews, documents, archives, direct observation, and participative observation. These methodological questions are then used to clarify the hypothesis or assumptions of each participants. Such assumptions or hypothesis are then compared to the research objectives and research questions written by the participants in the update of their thesis proposals.

DMK G1201 Entrepreneurship and International Management (5 credits)

 In addition to the Internet and mobile technology sector booms, new ventures have also been burgeoning in other industries including energy, healthcare, financial services, consumer, and retail.Entrepreneurship and innovation are not limited to new ventures only. All businesses, regardless of their size, age, industry, must undertake innovative and entrepreneurial activities must stay competitive and then be able to prosper and survive in the long run. For  new  ventures,  in  the  process  of  growth,  it  is  essential  to  pay  attention  to the trend  of globalization and expand geographically to enter different country markets. For established firms, internationalization is even more important because global competition and cooperation are inevitable. This course will start with various topics in entrepreneurship and innovation, and further discuss issues of firm internationalization and management of multinationals as well.

 The following phenomena and concepts will be discussed in this course: entrepreneurship/intrapreneurship, innovation:   radical vs. incremental; competence-enhancing vs. competence, destroying; product vs. process, phenomena in the high-tech industries: standard battles, dominant design, etc., frugal innovation, protecting innovation: IPR (intellectual property right) and licensing, new venture/liability of newness, venture capitalists, globalization of markets and internationalization of firms, the digest analysis of country markets, measuring culture (cultural distance, etc), strategy in the international firm:  the integration-responsiveness framework, entry strategies, etc., organization design in the international firm, internationalization of family businesses, functional management in international business.

DLO G1201 Organizational Structures and Change Management (5 credits)

The  classical  way  to  represent  the  structure  in  the  1950’s,  the  organizational  chart,  was increasingly criticized in the 1970’s: while multinational evolved from functional to divisional structure  organized  around  the  business,  none  of  the  change  in  the  chart  could  solve  the growing problems of cost, fragmentation and conflicts. Even the “matrix” structure appeared to immediately raise more problems than the ones supposed to be solved. In the 1980’s the different value chains attempts to represent the horizontal processes rather than the vertical hierarchy  reproduced  the  linearity  of  taylorism  and  neglected  to  include  R&D.  Therefore, beyond the dilemma of centralization vs decentralization, the new dimensions of mechanistic versus organic management system appeared. Such an improvement allows to describe 5 types of structures, to understand the adaptation of structures within different kinds of environment. It also allows to include the interest of the actors and the organization lifecycle and to identify different transformation paths such as the entrepreneurial transition or the innovative transition.

However, the management of such a transition implies a level of analysis much more focused on the teams and the potential conflicts of interests between actors. The conflicts highly depend of the type of change, of the wake-up call and of the competitive change initiatives in the corporation. Some tools such as the conditions for change, the team effectiveness, the targets for change and the change readiness may have a leverage effect on change management. From a more descriptive standpoint, the analysis of the field of actors, of a different kind of capital, of the dynamics, habitus and the way the structure is reproduced may allow understanding better the different kind of organizational moves that each actor may have.

The following concepts will be systematically discussed: Organizational charts: functional, divisional and matrix, value chains: Harvard, functional and computer integrated manufacturing, centralization and decentralization, mechanistic and organic management system, management systems and environment, actors and interests, the 5 basic kind of structures, the organizational lifecycle, entrepreneurial transition and innovative transition, stakeholders and interests, type of change, wake-up calls and actors, competitive initiatives, condition for change, team effectiveness, readiness for change, targets for change, fields, and actors, different kind of capitals and actors, dynamics, habitus, and structure reproduction, organizational “moves”, change management and business communication, meeting management. The link between each concept and underlying assumptions indicates a way to suggest a list of theoretical trends: Rationalism, functionalism, stakeholder theory, stakeholder agency theory, psycho-sociology, and the theory of practice.

DCRH 1101 & DRCH 1101b Methodology: Management research methods

 The course aims to develop research projects including research problem definition, qualitative and quantitative methodologies,   literature review,   theory-building   (or theory testing), epistemology, and research contribution. This inquiry aims at showing the importance of defining a research topic, an Objectivation process (or object of research), a research question, a research issue (or problematization) and to discuss the type of knowledge that may be elaborated and the expected research contribution. This IPAG DBA research method course is consistent with the IPAG DBA course on research case studies methodologies and the IPAG DBA research design workshops and with the IPAG DBA research proposal forms.

PDP 702 Executive Communication (5 credits)

Executive Communication shows participants how to build confidence and inspire action among internal and external audiences with an effective, consistent messaging strategy and tactics for becoming a more observant and effective communicator. Participants will learn how to guide their organizations through any challenge or obstacle. Executive Communication focuses on examining and expanding communication skills and executive presence. At the end of the course, participants will come away with a comprehensive toolkit of strategies to use for message development and delivery.

PDP 701 Leadership (5 credits)

The purpose of the course proposes to bridge the gap between various approaches to leadership and the theoretical aspects which tend to be more abstract. The course hopes to increase candidate’s understanding of how effective leaders motivate others to succeed, with focus on the multiple theories, styles, models, and principles found in the study of modern organizations, with a focus on public and non-profit organizations. Attention is given to discussion, analysis and critique of the theory and research literature. Students will be encouraged to challenge the conventional wisdom of current leadership thought, and reflect on their personal perspectives and experience within their organizations. This course also introduces students to the unique and practical issues of applied leadership research, such as balancing relevance and rigor. In addition the module utilizes leadership skills assessment tools to evaluate participants’ leadership abilities and highlight specific areas where one needs to focus on or undergo thorough research. Topics include: personality, behavior: tasks vs relationships, delegation vs innovation, control vs challenge, context: credibility, motivation, trust, ethics, shared values, transformation: transformational leadership, positive psychology, authentic leadership.

PDP703 Research Dissemination (5 credits)

This module covers the publication process and provides guidance on ‘how to publish’ in international high quality journals. A fundamental tenet of evidence-based management is that firms will function more effectively if they adopt a theoretically-driven, methodologically-sound approach to decision-making. Building on the basic tenets of theory and knowledge development, this course explores the tools and techniques needed for creating and disseminating knowledge. Participants are challenged to develop cross-disciplinary, evidence-based management practices through applied research that will effectively influence future management practice. Students will be exposed to the requirements for high quality articles as enshrined by top tier practitioner journals. All students will be schooled in reviewer guidelines of these journals as well as the reasons for success and failure. Also covered is the process of preparing one’s work for publication and successfully navigating the peer review process. Students will study journal selection and how to craft a response to reviewers. Each student will serve as an ad hoc reviewer for two the papers.

 

 

  SBS CERTIFICATION

  • Certificate in Contemporary Management from NiBS
  • Master of Applied Business Research (MABR) from SBS Swiss Business School, Zurich, Switzerland.
  • Doctor of Business Administration (DBA) from SBS Swiss Business School, Zurich, Switzerland.

 

 IPAG CERTIFICATION

 

  • Certificate in Contemporary Management from NiBS
  • Doctor of Business Administration (DBA) from IPAG Business School, Paris, France.

 

New DBA in Africa: a review of the opening ceremony of the IPAG Business School program

On Thursday, January 23, 2020, more than 30 guests attended the opening ceremony of the DAG program of the IPAG Business School in Ghana to welcome the doctoral students who have been selected to participate in this 3-year doctoral program – managed program. in close collaboration with the Nobel International Business School in Ghana.

Doctor Bernard Terrany, Director of International Relations and Development of IPAG, presided over the opening ceremony. It was an opportunity for him to introduce the school in his welcome speech and to underline the importance of lifelong learning in a constantly changing business environment. Bernard Terrany also encouraged the students to become “executive-researchers” and thus to contribute to the development of academic knowledge.

Professor Raphaël Lissillour, director of the IPAG DBA program, presented the structure and characteristics of the courses to the students. He also mentioned the importance of management research as a means of producing relevant work by linking academic research to the real needs of the business world.

Read More. →

Benedict Asiedu  Amankwah
DBA, Program Manager, Ghana
Tel: +233 (0) 262 367 830
Email: basiedu@nibs.edu.gh

Jennifer Nketiah – Sika
PhD, Program Manager
Tel: +233 (0) 278 961 059

Email: jennifer@nibs.edu.gh

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